No-strings-attached cash assistance goes to hundreds of Denver residents

Food, clothes and other services were offered by Mutual Aid outside the Denver City and County Building on May 10, 2022, when people experiencing homelessness and housing advocates gave comment during a Denver City Council meeting. (Andrew Fraieli for Colorado Newsline)

For a few hundred members of Denver’s unhoused population, the Denver Basic Income Project has provided an opportunity for stability they haven’t been able to secure on their own.

Mark Donovan, founder of the Denver Basic Income Project , said the project intends to explore the impact direct cash assistance can have on encouraging “a healthier society centered around human thriving.”

“We believe that providing an income floor with these cash transfers creates the foundation upon which people can advance toward whatever the next step is for them in their life,” Donovan said.

GET THE MORNING HEADLINES DELIVERED TO YOUR INBOX

In November, the DBIP started its full-scale operations providing no-strings-attached funding to 820 people across three cohorts. The DBIP raised over $8.3 million to support its efforts, including funding from the city of Denver, the state of Colorado, grants and other donors. The University of Denver’s Center for Housing and Homelessness Research is also running a randomized controlled trial in conjunction with the project to get data on how well it works.

Story continues

LATEST NEWS NEAR YOU

LATEST LOCAL NEWS